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The Writer Writing Fiction

The Writer Writing Fiction:

Everything from scripts/screenplays to YA novels. NSFW blog at times.

Writer. I write about couples, mental health (psychological disorders), social issues, and relationships. Hell yes, you'll find pop culture allusions in my work.

Ultimate dream: write the next big contemporary teen drama (tv series) and have it on television!

This is my sanctuary for written, visual, & audio inspiration and manifestation for my writing and stories! Horror, scary, psychological, love, relationships, sex, family, couples, quotes, and all that good stuff. Pretty conflicting and complex, but who isn't?
Contributing Authors
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psych2go:

Sigmund Freud– probably the most misunderstood doctor in the history of psychology.

To start off:

No, Freud didn’t just go around telling people they had unconscious desires to have sexual intercourse with their parents. (Oedipus complex, anyone?)

No, Freud was not crazy and he did not prescribe cocaine to all of his patients as a quick fix.

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foodaddictofficial:

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Landscape Architect

If you quit college because you just couldn’t stand to be inside all the time, landscape architect might be right for you. You would be planning and designing the landscaping of yards and other green areas. Most people in this field work for themselves and getting…

whiteboysdatingblackgirls:

           Follow my blog : http://whiteboysdatingblackgirls.tumblr.com/ 

                              http://mediumrarerecords.org/YourGift

When you write, you’re telling yourself the story. When you rewrite, your main job is taking out all the things that are not the story.
Stephen King (via hello095)

(via writeworld)

All parents damage their children. It cannot be helped. Youth, like pristine glass, absorbs the prints of its handlers. Some parents smudge, others crack, a few shatter childhoods completely into jagged little pieces, beyond repair.
Mitch Albom, The Five People You Meet in Heaven (via kushandwizdom)

avajae:

As I’ve been going through the intern slush, I’ve noticed that many times, when I recommend a rejection, it’s largely because of voice. Voice, to me, is one of the most important elements in a novel, because if it’s wrong on the first page, it’s usually wrong throughout the whole manuscript.

Being that I read a lot of YA submissions, this post is largely centered on voice-related problems I frequently see with YA submissions. But many of these issues can also apply to NA by looking at the points with a slightly older cast in mind.

YA Voice Red Flags:

  • Lack of contractions. This can actually be a problem in any category, but it’s especially important in YA manuscripts—a voice without any contractions always sounds stiff. This is one of the easiest (and often one of the first) voice-related red flags I pick out. Why? Because we speak and think with contractions, so when they’re absent, the writing becomes stilted and loses a great deal of flow, making it extraordinarily easy to pick it out. “I am not feeling well so I can not go,” for example, doesn’t sound nearly as fluid as, “I’m not feeling well so I can’t go.” Agreed? Good.
  • Outdated slang. If you’re writing YA, you need to be current with the language—no exceptions. For examples, teenagers today don’t really say “talk to the hand” or “phat” or “what’s the 411” anymore. (Note: those weren’t taken from actual submissions, I’m just giving outdated examples). Outdated slang, to me, is an enormous red flag and tells me the writer isn’t reading enough YA. 
  • Forced (current) slang. This is an equally problematic, but harder to spot problem. Sometimes I see submissions that use current slang, but the waythey use it feels…off. This is a little harder to describe, but the easiest way to ferret them out of your manuscript is to have critique partners and/or beta readers who are up to date with the current slang read your manuscript. 
  • Corny curse substitutions. This is a biggie. While not all teenagers curse, many of them do—and when they don’t, they don’t often use corny substitutions. “Frickin’” for example, could work as a substitution for a particular four-letter word, but “french fries” probably won’t. 

    Note: UNLESS your character makes a point of being corny, or it fits with your voice. I won’t say this never works (because I’m sure there’s a book out there that can make it happen), but to be honest, I’ve yet to see it work successfully with exception to “D’Arvit” in Artemis Fowl, which mostly worked because it wasn’t corny—it was a made up gnomish word. 
  • Teenager stereotypes. This is huge. When I see teenager stereotypes blended into the voice or the characters, it almost always puts me off. Teenagers are not a sum of their stereotypes, and relying on them in your writing, quite frankly, is lazy. You can do better–and teenagers deserve better. 


Solutions:

  • Listen to teenagers talk. A lot. Don’t have a teenager in your life? That’s fine—watch YA-centered TV shows and movies. They tend to feature teenagers who are effortlessly up to date with current slang, references, etc. Or go to your local mall and do a little (subtle) eavesdropping. Yes, really. It’s research. 
  • Read YA. By and large, the YA that’s published today (especially if it’s relatively recent) have great examples of successful YA voices. Read them. Learn from them. Write your own. (This step by the way? Not optional if you’re writing YA). 
  • Get critique partners. This is so ridiculously important—make sure you have beta readers and critique partners look at your work. I personally recommend having several rounds of betas and CPs, so you can see if the changes you made in the first round, for example, were as effective as you hoped. 


Would you add anything to either list? Unmentioned problems? Solutions?

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

policymic:

7 lies we have to stop telling about African-American female students

There is a myth that African-American girls generally fare better than African-American boys — that they somehow have it easier. This creates a potentially damaging narrative that may ultimately prevent society from truly empowering these young women.

Here are seven myths that we need to stop repeating when it comes to African-American women and the achievement gap.

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(via blackgirlsrpretty2)

When women scream you wonder what’s wrong with them. When men yell you get afraid about what they’re going to do.
A girl in my creative writing class said this in response to a story we read about witnessing intimate partner violence and it really fucked with my head because I’ve never, ever, ever, thought of it that way.  (via astronomized)

(via love-personal)

writeworld:

Writer’s Block


In one sentence is the spark of a story. Ignite.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a memory about this sentence. Write something about this sentence.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

(via grabbed)